Brian Alvey leaves WIN

by Peter Rojas


Man, now Brian too! Brian pinged me earlier today to let me know that he was hanging it up here at WIN, officially marking the end of our three-and-a-half year partnership. Working with Brian has been amazing experience, Brian has the most intense work ethic of anyone I've ever met and single-handedly built and developed Blogsmith into a world-class content management system. I know he's involved with ComicMix now, but if anyone deserves some time off, it's Brian. Hard to believe I'm the last one left...


Time for a podcast player unconference?

by Peter Rojas


I know it's been a while since I talked about this, but I was just thinking the other day about Dave Winer's panel at Mix07 about creating the perfect podcast player and thought: Why don't we do a unconference about this? We saw so much interest and excitement about the prospect of building one, it'd be awesome to get a bunch of smart, creative people all in the same place at the same time to talk about it. I could see UI experts interacting with hardware engineers, software gurus chatting with podcasters about what features they'd want for producing podcasts, gadget enthusiasts (like me) talking about what works and what doesn't about the current players that are out there, etc. I have no idea whether it'd get us any closer to getting one built, but it's hard to imagine that SOMETHING positive wouldn't come out of so many motivated people coming together with a common goal in mind. Dave, you up for it? I'll be back in San Francisco next month, I'm sure we could throw something together.


Thanks

by Peter Rojas


Crazy week, huh? I hate talking about Engadget over here, since technically this is supposed to be my personal blog, but I would like to say thanks to everyone for their patience and understanding during this whole situation.


Harry McCracken takes a stand for editorial integrity, leaves PC World in protest

by Peter Rojas


Just read over at Epicenter that PC World Editor-in-Chief Harry McCracken quit in protest today because the mag's new CEO wanted to spike a "whimsical article" titled "Ten Things We Hate About Apple." Guess the new CEO didn't want to alienate Apple, and apparently he had been telling editors to be softer in their reviews of products from companies that advertise in the magazine. It's a complete violation of church and state for a publisher to try and manipulate editorial to please advertisers (or potential advertisers), and I gotta say, I support what Harry did 100% and have a tremendous amount of respect for the stand he took. That kind of integrity and honor is all too rare these days. I've been extremely fortunate in that I've never had to face a similiar situation here at Engadget. One of the things I most worried about after I sold the site to AOL is that they'd try to water down the editorial or try and tell me what to do or what to write (or not write). I made it clear to them from day one that I'd never compromise our editorial integrity, and to their credit, no one at AOL has ever tried to interfere with what we write -- in fact, I've never had any kind of discussion with anyone at AOL about what direction our editorial should take, Ryan and I have just run things exactly as we've seen fit.

Harry, I'm sure you're going to be contacted by a ton of publications in the coming days and weeks, but we'd be more than happy to have you with us here at Engadget in whatever capacity you'd want.